For urban or suburban dog owners, you probably know of a local dog park, but do you understand the unspoken rules of leash etiquette here? This canine oasis lets your furry friend prance around without the leash, where he can run, sniff, and socialize with the other dogs. But before you get too deep into it, understanding the basic rules of etiquette at a dog park can help keep your dog and other dogs safe from the risks.

Don't Bring Sick Dogs to the Park

Whenever your dog shows signs of disease or illness, you shouldn't take them to the park because this can infect the other dogs. It sounds like common sense, but you'd be surprised how many dog owners disregard it. If you notice another dog that seems sickly, it might be a good time to go home early.

Don't Bring Puppies of Less Than Four Months

Young puppies aren't good at the park because they probably haven’t had all their vaccinations. You want to at least wait until after vaccination to associate with older dogs. If you take your puppy there at any younger age, they will be vulnerable to passing diseases with the other dogs. After vaccinations or at least four months, this is a great place and opportunity to have them start socializing with other dogs.

Aggressive Dogs are Bad for the Park

s part of park etiquette, you should never let your dog take an aggressive attitude with other dogs. That can spawn fighting and injuries. If your dog isn't friendly socially with other dogs, you will first want to train before bringing them, to keep everyone safe.

Bring a Portable Water Bowl

The local water bowls at the dog park can be a breeding ground for communicable diseases, so you might want to avoid them. Unfortunately, not everyone follows this etiquette and sometimes many dogs in one place leads to aggressive behavior.

If you were bitten by someone else's dog, hiring a personal injury attorney is usually your best bet. Never let your dog run in a pack, and if the play gets too rough, shout to stop, but don't get between two snarling dogs. While dogs will play with other dogs, if they sense weakness, the play can quickly turn into a danger. Good manners are essential for you to have the best time, but luckily, many of them are common sense things that are more about courtesy and thinking of others and the safety of your dog.

References:

http://www.akc.org/content/dog-training/articles/puppy-socialization/

http://www.hasnerlaw.com/locations/atlanta/

http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/dog-diseases-conditions-a-z